Amber girl with brown hair in white sweater
My name is Amber Gobell and I have been clean for 4 years and 8 months. My clean date is 7/20/16. I am most proud that I returned to school to pursue my bachelor’s degree in Conservation Biology. I am currently on the President’s List for receiving a 4.0 GPA. I am also proud that I am an awesome mom to my puppy Churro! I love all my hobbies in recovery; such as, making art, riding my motorcycle, and working on my car and motorcycles. I have also gotten close to my family and friends again. Prior to recovery, my entire life was a series of low points. A childhood of abuse and trauma led to a teenage nightmare of struggle. I started meddling with hard drugs when I was 14-years-old and my decline was rapid and unforgiving. I tried to get clean several times throughout my teenage and young adult years. I was in outpatient treatment, impatient treatment, mental hospitals, detox, sober houses, and jail several times in the last few years of active addiction. Those times of reaching out for help or being incarcerated were not my lowest points, but glimpses of light shining on me after some of the darkest experiences of my life. I had never imagined things would become so dark. My lowest point lasted from the moment I stuck a needle in my arm until the day I decided I did not want to die and HAD to get clean. Today, I am selfless by nature and try to set an example for those out there still suffering. I was an active participant when living out of an Oxford House. I was an active member and truly cared about the stability of that house and the women and children that lived there. I most recently introduced a friend to recovery by suggesting that she try NA and AA. I often find myself spreading the message of recovery to people who need help. None of my success or happiness would be possible without recovery. My greatest contribution to my community is the strength of my recovery and being able to share it so that others may find their way.
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Almost 21 million Americans have at least one addiction, yet only 10% of them receive treatment.